Clinic Details

5953 Dallas Parkway, Suite 200B
Plano, TX 75093

Phone: (972) 330-2658
Fax: (972) 378-2110

Hours of Operation

  • Mon: 08:30AM – 05:30PM
  • Tue: 07:00AM – 07:00PM
  • Wed: 08:30AM – 05:30PM
  • Thu: 07:00AM – 07:00PM
  • Fri: 08:30AM – 05:30PM
  • Sat: 09:00AM – 01:00PM
  • Sun: Closed
  • View Holiday Hours

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General Information

Welcome to Low T Center – Plano!

Your Low T Center in Plano, is designed to make your visit easy and convenient. The Plano physicians utilize an onsite certified laboratory to diagnose Low T conditions in men, and recommend appropriate treatment options tailored for each patient. We invite you to come see for yourself why we’ve been so successful in helping men get treatment for Low T symptoms.

Feel Younger, More Energetic.

If you’ve been experiencing symptoms of Low T (read more about Low T here), then the Low T Center is just what you’ve been looking for.

We’ve organized Low T Center to fit your busy schedule and unique needs:

  • Conveniently Located
  • No Appointment required
  • No Insurance Hassles / Requirements
  • Affordable Personalized Care Plans

If you qualify for testosterone replacement therapy (tests are performed right here onsite at 5953 Dallas Parkway, Suite 200B), your provider can get you started on your first visit. Like any medical condition there is no “one-size-fits-all” solution, and each patient’s treatment is tailored by their physician to meet their specific situation.

So if you’re experiencing Low T symptoms and are searching for low testosterone treatments in Plano, or want to find out more about your current condition, stop in and visit our local office today. No appointment is necessary, and after the first visit (where we run initial tests), your subsequent visits take no more than a few minutes each.

Stop in today!

You may be able to save time by downloading and completing these Patient Forms now.

Our Healthcare Providers

Phuong Tran, M.D.

Dr. Tran graduated from the University of Houston with a degree in Biochemical and biophysical science.  He then moved to Dallas and earned a medical degree at University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in 2006.  After medical school, he continued his Internal Medicine training at UT Southwestern and is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine.  Prior to joining the Low T Center as a medical director, Dr. Tran spent five years as an Assistant Professor at UT Southwestern Medical School and Parkland Hospital. 


P. Michael Whitfield, APRN

Michael Whitfield graduated from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi in 2008 with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing. He worked in the Medical/Surgical Unit at Methodist Hospital in Richardson before attending Texas Women’s University where he earned his master’s degree as an Advanced Practice Nurse. He worked in internal medicine as well as primary care clinics before joining Low T Center.

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